Anatomy of a pew pewer Shirt

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Erasistratus was also a practising physician, but his writings and biological views have a physiological rather than an anatomical bias (Dobson, 1927). His efforts to explain physiological principles mechanistically rather than by hidden forces were not popular and attracted ridicule from later authorities including Galen. Like Herophilus, he distinguished between (hard) motor and (soft) sensory nerves, indeed some have credited the younger man with being the first to make this distinction. Erasistratus described four ventricles in the brain, noting that the fourth ventricle under the cerebellum communicated with the third, whereas Herophilus seems not to have noticed the third ventricle: this may have been the first description of the cerebral aqueduct (Tsuchiya et al. 2015). He likened the cerebral gyri to the coils of the small intestine and, long before Thomas Willis (1664), he suggested that the extensive cortical surface of the human brain was in some way related to intelligence, …since man greatly surpasses other beings in intelligence, his brain is greatly convoluted. He considered that each organ was supplied by a network of fine tubes (woven triplets), wherein veins carried blood, arteries carried vital pneuma and hollow nerves carried psychic pneuma from the ventricles in the brain (for further reading on the doctrine of pneuma in Western scientific tradition, see Frixione, 2013). Frederick Ruysch popularised a very similar view in 1696, proposing that tissues were composed of vascular networks (he had perfected a method of injecting vessels with wax, a technique that became known as the ‘Ruyschian Art’) (Haviland & Parish, 1970).

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Anatomy of a pew pewer Shirt5
Anatomy of a pew pewer Shirt1
Anatomy of a pew pewer Shirt1

Anatomy of a pew pewer Shirt

Erasistratus described the heart valves and recognised that the heart functioned as a pump, likening it to a blacksmith’s bellows. He considered the heart to be the source of the arteries and veins, recalling a similar description in the treatise on the heart in the Ebers papyrus. He knew that the anatomical ends of the arteries were the beginnings of the veins, but was convinced that the blood remained within the veins and at no point normally encroached on the breath‐vessels (arteries), calling the potential connections between them synanastomoses: Galen later demonstrated that arteries also contain blood (Sternbach et al. 2011). Some writers have suggested that Erasistratus came close to discovering the circulation of the blood because he believed that pneuma, like blood, could only flow one way, directed by valves within the heart (Dobson, 1927; Pasipoularides, 2013); others regard this as an unfounded and extravagant claim.

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